raw partition

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  RChandra 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #6062

    stevenr1111
    Participant

    in short I shut my computer down normally. Two hours later I restarted it only to get a hard drive error. Checking it out on another pc I find that the partition has been marked RAW. I have done many searches on google and youtube looking for a process to repair this issue without data loss. Every bit of advice has been to use this software or that software. So far each of them has forced me to do a deep scan 12+ hours and then to be told it will cost 50 to 75 bucks to finish. Could someone give me a step by step procedure to fix this mess?? And yes I am running both an antivirus and malware program that was up to date as of friday. Oh … and I’m running XP.

    #6066

    HotDawg
    Participant

    I haven’t seen this type of error. Here are some thoughts.

    What type of file structure is the drive partitioned as? FAT32? And what size is it?

    The RAW designation, from what I understand, is used by some operating systems to indicate a drive that hasn’t been formatted. But I suppose for some older machines where they don’t automatically detect the correct drive parameters, some corruption to the BIOS settings might result in a drive not being accessed properly. You might double check what the BIOS is reporting out for the drive, like for size of HD, and so on.

    Another serious quirk I’ve run into is where you have a computer with a large enough drive to use the EFI (GPT, or whatever) boot rather than the MBR for describing disk layouts. My motherboard does not really like to have the two types of disk formats mixed on the machine. It will handle either sort of OK, but not both without strange results. While the HD you are having a problem with is an XP system, what OS on the guest machine you tried the drive on? (And, how big are the other drives on it?)

    If you have the diagnostic software from the HD’s mother, you might give that a try. Most of those (and you can usually download them for free) do a good job of diagnosing problems. Just be careful you don’t run any of the destructive tests (like write zeros, and so on) — unless you really want to start over from with the drive.

    And, a little rant: So many of the searches using like Google and Yahoo! return hits that are really just ads to sucker you into some overpriced software (yeh, FREE download!) that will solve all your problems.

    There is one for-sale utility, Spinrite, (http://crc.com) that used to do a good job of checking and repairing drives with failing sectors, but with the size of drives these days it isn’t practical.

    Keep us posted on what you find.

    #6068

    HotDawg
    Participant

    Update on RAW partition.

    On my computer, running Win 7, if I allocate some space on a hard drive to a partition — but do not format it, then it will show up as being a RAW partition. That is in place of NTFS designation had I formatted the partition.

    When you see the RAW for a partition that you know was being OK before, that tells me that for some reason the disk is not being read 100% correctly. Until I was sure why that is, I don’t think I would do much writing to the disk

    #6069

    stevenr1111
    Participant

    thanks for your response. Most of your answer is right on, in that there are a lot of sucker ads. my file system (was) ntfs and it was all one partition. It wasn’t that large, only 150gb. I hate to spend the $ for retrieval software but if I can’t find a way to repair it I will. I have already run the scans which took close to 24 hours and have found most of the data files I want. But then came the …. oh by the way to continue it will cost you.

    #6070
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Since this helped troubleshoot a sound card, I’m thinking it could help with the hard drive problem also. See if Ubuntu can recognize your Windows partition and read the files. If so, you’d at least have a way to copy the files to a backup drive, before making any risky changes to the partition.

    #6075

    stevenr1111
    Participant

    I’mgoing to be going out of town for a few weeks so it will be awhile before I can dig into it

    #6079

    RChandra
    Participant

    If you’re fortunate, all that happened is the type byte in the partition table was corrupted. My suggestion would be to run GPartEd (GNOME partition editor). It is available in many Linux distributions, but it is also available as a Debian bootable image (which you can write to a CD, USB flash drive, or even PXE boot (although I suppose that is sort of for ├╝ber geeks)).

    In any case, you may wish to use drive cloner software first, so that if nothing else, you can get back to how you are right now should you mess something up (worse?) with what you try. My suggestion would be Clonezilla; it’s free/open source, and has worked fairly well for me.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  RChandra. Reason: corrected name, added link to gparted.org
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