PostScript Printers

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Christian Christian 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #1547
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    After owning a couple of GDI printers, I’m ready to invest in something better. I’d like to get a postscript printer since those are natively supported in *nix. This probably means a color laser, though LED printers sound interesting.

    I’m getting stuck reading about the difference between printers that have postscript 3 emulation and ones with Adobe postscript. Very few of those I’ve looked at use Adobe postscript, probably due to licensing costs. There seems to be no consensus about how well various manufacturers’ emulation works. Apparently if the postscript job is too complex it may encounter a bug in the printer’s implementation, but some people even encountered problems using Adobe postscript. All these printers also support PCL 6. I’m sure that would also work. I’ve just had such a bad experience with GDI printers that I wanted to switch to the most natively supported technology. Anyone have experience with using postscript printers under Linux/Unix? Should I be concerned about the quality of different companies’ postscript emulation or is the chance of encountering a bug when printing from typical FOSS desktop apps too low to worry about. I’m willing to spend up to $400.

    #1590
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Got it pretty much narrowed down to the HP M451DN and Xerox 6500DN. I’m leaning towards the Xerox. What I don’t understand is why so many Xerox Phasers are listed as “Mostly” working on openprinting.org. They have native postscript and list Linux/Unix among their officially supported operating systems. Perhaps it is something like not being able to install a toner-monitoring app. If that was the case I could live with it.

    Regarding Adobe postscript vs emulation, I decided it didn’t matter. At least a couple people said they preferred the non-Adobe interpreter. Most of the complaints were coming from people printing postscript generated from Adobe applications, so of course the Adobe interpreter probably works better with those. As a side note, I found out most of the non-Adobe interpreters are supplied by Xionics (now Oak Technology).

    #1603
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Decided on the Xerox for its Adobe postscript interpreter (amazing at this price), higher memory, and it’s $100 cheaper. The unsupported features did turn out to be just some printer utilities, but I can still get access to those controls through the web interface. Also, Unix systems must connect through ethernet (not USB), but I was planning to do that anyway.

    #1620
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Of course I’ll be buying it out of town, and in cash – don’t want those yellow dots to lead back to me.

    #1621
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Actually, I removed my tin foil hat long enough to order online – but I was able to place the order without agreeing to the site’s terms and conditions.

    After actually reading a few of these contracts, I’m pretty quick at skimming them for certain things. Sure enough, they would like to retain ownership of any software included in the shipment.

    So I used a nifty Firefox extension called Tamper Data, which lets you view and alter the contents of an HTML form, after you press the submit button, but before it gets sent back to the website. I found a field named “agreedtoterms” and changed its value from “true” to “nope”. Usually a website will verify such fields once they receive the submitted form, but this place didn’t.

    #1640
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    So, end of story, it works. Had to run out to IKEA and buy a small table for it. Even though I ordered the “DN” model, they ship you the standard version and a separate box containing the “duplexer unit”. It only took a couple minutes to install though. Did the manual color registration as was suggested in a couple of reviews. The printer was automatically detected by CUPS, just had to add the downloaded PPD file. No need for any software since everything is configurable via its web interface and LCD panel. The other Debian laptop in my house is setup to search my desktop for printers. I forgot about that, went to set it up, and was pleasantly surprised when I saw the new printer was already installed and set as default.

    By the way, I held one of the pages up to a blue light, and you actually can see a yellow dot pattern on printed pages (I checked a blank page just to be sure and they weren’t there). What is this for?

    #3105

    saimawilson
    Participant

    Usually, this is the type of prints use use of my business promotional campaign prints, even in large format. It was all done by http://digitekprinting.com/, a reliable print shop in or community. Good that they have perfect devices that can prints same idea as you have shared here.

    #3107
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    Found the spammer.

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