How to recover video from DVD's

Home Forums Macintosh How to recover video from DVD's

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Christian Christian 4 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #885

    bklyn
    Participant

    Long ago in a universe far far away…

    A lot of home video was burned to / archives to DVD’s.

    Now I’d like to recover the files in a manner that allows import into Final Cut Pro X (etc.) but haven’t found a way to recover the DVD contents as editable files.

    Suggestions gratefully accepted!

    #896
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    DVDs use the VOB container format for storing video, audio and subtitles. If Final Cut can’t import those directly, you can use a transcoding tool to convert to something more universal like MP4. I like ffmpeg for this.

    Something like this should do it:
    ffmpeg -i <input-file>.vob -acodec copy -vcodec copy <output-file>.mp4

    The “copy” options tell ffmpeg to put the audio and video streams into the new container (MP4) without re-encoding. Anytime you re-encode you’ll lose a bit of quality.

    There’s a GUI version for OS X here: http://www.ffmpegx.com/

    If you want the real deal (the command line tool), there’s versions for OS X here:
    http://www.evermeet.cx/ffmpeg/

    Alternatively, you can get it using Macports or Fink.

    Update: Final Cut Pro might not support AC3 audio in an MP4 container. It might be better to re-encode the audio to the more common AAC like so:
    ffmpeg -i <input-file>.vob -acodec libfaac -ab 384k -vcodec copy <output-file>.mp4

    Finally, I’ve heard there’s a trick where you can simply change the extension from .vob to .mpg, which might help programs that don’t recognize VOB. This works because VOB is just a specific type of MPEG.

    #907
    Steve Rea
    Steve Rea
    Keymaster

    There is also DVDxDV, iRIP, and Handbrake that can convert the DVD format into a format that FinalCut can import.
    THey probably use ffmpeg under the hood, but are GUI based.

    #909
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    If you end up re-encoding the video you might as well choose a codec that works really well for editing. Codecs designed for playback such as MPEG don’t store every frame of video which can make for inaccurate/sluggish timeline scrolling. DV is a good choice since you’re working with standard definition. M-JPEG is very similar to DV and works at any resolution. If M-JPEG isn’t available, you can use a codec such as MPEG-2 or MPEG-4 if you set the GOP (group of pictures) size to 1. This forces MPEG based codecs to store every frame, increasing the size, but making editing easier.

    #915

    smileeb
    Participant

    Would winff help convert files for doing this?

    #917
    Christian
    Christian
    Participant

    WinFF looks to be the Windows equivalent of FFmpegX, i.e. a GUI for ffmpeg, so if you were on Windows that would be one option.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed.